How Does Streaming Work?

Article by Herb Kimble.

Streaming has become a popular technology for delivering content over the internet. You can watch your favorite TV show or listen to a great song on your mobile device or computer. You can even stream full-length movies.

Streaming transmits data over an internet connection, allowing the user to begin listening or watching right away. With downloads, you must wait until the entire program, song or file has been fully downloaded before viewing or listening to it.

What Is Buffering?

With streaming, the media is sent to a temporary memory called a Buffer as you’re interacting with it. The most common problem is that your internet connection is not fast enough to keep the Buffer full of content so that you have to wait for new content to arrive. When this happens, there are glitches in the video and audio as the temporary memory is trying to catch up with the user’s needs.

What is a Progressive Download?

Before streaming technology became popular, the only way to view content over the internet was a progressive download. In this instance, the user must wait for all the content to be downloaded to their device. Then they can open the file and view or listen to it. The file resides on the user’s computer (or device) until it is deleted. With streaming, the file is automatically deleted after you view it.

What Is Live Streaming?

The term “live streaming” is often used to describe the streaming of live television programs. If you have one of the new internet based TV services, such as Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime, they use live streaming so you can watch regular live TV using an internet connection.

This article was provided by Herb Kimble. Herb Kimble is an entrepreneur, as well as a dedicated actor, and growing film producer. He is currently based in the Los Angeles area, where he has co-founded CineFocus Productions and is working toward the release of his upcoming streaming service, Urban Flix.

Changes in the Movie Business

Article by Herb Kimble.

We have had some interesting revelations for filmmaking in the last few years. Indies learned that building a social media following is crucial to success, but we also learned that some standards degrade even as visual effects became more important to filmmaking. It’s now 2019 and we’re all mobile. What role that trend will play in the future of film is still not clear, but here are some ideas on what could happen.

Costs of Technology

Part of the reason that distribution felt like a risky proposition was universal adoption. Technology is much cheaper than it was before, and more people have screens that can broadcast movies on them at all times. Mobile Web also gives us digital video anywhere our travels take us, so streaming may take off as more studios recognize that the demand is there. The true conundrum is infrastructure and payment. Figuring out who gets which piece of the pie, and how big that piece is, can take a lot of delicate negotiating. Still, we have already seen Warner Bros. test this kind of marketing with distribution on Facebook.

Fans and Financing

Funding for films has taken an interesting route lately with crowdfunded projects like the Veronica Mars film. Traditional financing still has a place, but fan-funded films come with a built-in fanbase that makes them attractive to distributors. This trend may continue to grow, hopefully with some regulation in place to make the atmosphere less of a Wild West. As is, the fan who backs a film shoulders the risk. Even though that risk is mitigated over several hundred or thousand people, fans with a stake of ownership in the film may be more invested (and vocal) about the outcome.

This article was written by Herb Kimble. Herb Kimble is an entrepreneur, director, and a film producer. He is the founder of Urban Flix, a streaming network that specializes in multi-cultural content and CineFocus Productions, a film production company.